PepsiCo is Going to Start Putting Its Aquafina Water in Aluminum Cans

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PepsiCo Inc. recently announced that it will start putting its Aquafina water in Aluminum Cans. According to the brand, the cans of Aquafina water will be a test to see how sustainable the new packaging is.  The Aquafina canned water experiment will start sometime in 2020. They plan to be offering them to partners like Stadiums and restaurants. The decision to experiment with Aquafina water in cans comes after the whole industry has been receiving a lot of backlash for using plastic.

PepsiCo is Going to Start Putting Its Aquafina Water in Aluminum Cans

PepsiCo is Going to Start Putting Its Aquafina Water in Aluminum Cans

According to the brand, the new canned water will take effect from next year. By taking this decision the brand is trying to reduce its plastic usage which has a detrimental effect on the environment. Choosing aluminium is more beneficial to the environment than plastic because Aluminum cans generally contain more reused materials than plastic bottles. Another reason why aluminium cans are a great idea is that consumers are more likely to recycle them than plastic bottles. They are also good because they are less likely to float away in the ocean. If PepsiCo is able to pull this off this will be the highest profile case of companies stopping the use of plastic.

Other Efforts from PepsiCo to Reduce Its Use of Plastic

Apart from its decision to can Aquafina water, the brand is making other moves to reduce its use of plastic. They are also transitioning its upscale bottled water brand, LIFEWTR, to 100 per cent recycled plastic in the U.S. The plan to be fully transitioned by the end of next year. This push is part of their plan to use 25 per cent recycled plastic globally by 2025.

The brand also plans to stop selling its Bubbly sparkling water in plastic bottles. Bubbly is already primarily distributed in cans, but gas stations and convenience stores now carry 20-ounce bottles. Their plan will eliminate  more than 8,000 metric tons of virgin plastic, according to the Purchase, New York-based company

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